Showing 1-10 of 10 assets

Chance Discoveries: Kevlar

Date : 11/03/2011

Clip Length : 

In this NBC Learn video, part of a series on "Chance Discoveries" in chemistry, veteran NBC News war correspondent Richard Engel tells the story of lab work done in 1965 by DuPont chemist Stephanie Kwolek that unexpectedly produced Kevlar, a lightweight fiber five times stronger than steel. Kevlar fibers can be spun into anti-ballistic, shrapnel-resistant material for protective body armor worn by police forces, military troops and those in combat zones, including Engel himself.

Chance Discoveries: Kevlar
Post-9/11: Airline Adds Kevlar, Titanium Locks, to Strengthen Cockpit Doors

Date : 10/17/2001

Clip Length : 

JetBlue Airlines adds bulletproof Kevlar backing and titanium locks to strengthen cockpit doors in their aircraft as an anti-terrorism measure, in the weeks after the terror attacks on September 11, 2001.

Post-9/11: Airline Adds Kevlar, Titanium Locks, to Strengthen Cockpit Doors
Safety Gear

Date : 12/08/2009

Clip Length : 00:05:36

Most Winter Olympic sports are high-speed and dangerously high-impact, from ski-jumping to short track speed-skating to hockey. To protect their skulls and brains, athletes wear protective helmets. NSF-funded scientists Melissa Hines, Director of the Cornell University Center for Materials Research, and Kathy Flores from Ohio State University's Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, explain how a helmet's hard outer shell works to dissipate energy, and foam linings work to absorb energy. Olympic athletes Julie Chu, a member of the U.S. Women's Hockey Team, and Scott Macartney, a U.S. Ski Team member who suffered a concussion in a 2008 fall, talk about the importance of helmets to Olympic competitors.

Safety Gear
Competition Suits

Date : 12/08/2009

Clip Length : 00:05:13

The chemistry and materials science used to create aerodynamic competition suits is described by NSF-funded scientists Melissa Hines of Cornell, Troy Flanagan of the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association, and U.S. Olympic speed skaters Trevor Marsicano and Chad Hedrick; U.S. luge team members Erin Hamlin and Mark Grimmette; U.S. ski team members Scott Macartney and Anders Johnson; and U.S. bobsledder Steve Holcomb.

Competition Suits
What Makes Kevlar So Strong, and How Can It Be So Light At The Same Time?

Date : 10/17/2005

Clip Length : 1

This 2005 Scientific American article explains how Kevlar, an aromatic polyamide (aramid) fabric, is strong enough to protect against ballistics and shrapnel, yet lightweight enough for soldiers to maneuver in and vehicles to carry without compromising speed or fuel-efficiency. Source: Scientific American, October 17, 2005

What Makes Kevlar So Strong, and How Can It Be So Light At The Same Time?
Enhanced Armor

Date : 05/15/2006

Clip Length : 2

This 2006 Scientific American article reports on advances in strong yet lightweight materials for body and combat vehicle armor, including ultrahigh-hardness (UHH) steels and the development of ballistic fabric infused with "liquid armor." Source: Scientific American, May 15, 2006

Enhanced Armor
Fashion of the Highest Caliber: Company Makes Bulletproof Clothing

Date : 01/28/1975

Clip Length : 

This 1975 news story reports on the an Illinois apparel manufacturer making a new line of clothing from Kevlar, a material five times stronger than steel, that even .357 Magnum bullets can't penetrate (as demonstrations prove). Target market: men and women fearful of "big city" crime and assault.

Fashion of the Highest Caliber: Company Makes Bulletproof Clothing
Design Elements That Contribute to Body Armor Comfort

Date : 11/01/2001

Clip Length : 1

Diagram showing design and construction elements of a body armor vest that contribute to wearer's comfort and mobility. Source: NIJ National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center Guide 100-01, November, 2001

Design Elements That Contribute to Body Armor Comfort
Law Enforcement Officers Killed Wearing Protective Armor, by Cause of Death, 1990-99

Date : 01/01/1999

Clip Length : 1

Pie chart showing cause of death of law enforcement officers killed while wearing protective body armor, between 1990 and 1999. More than half were killed by gunshot wounds to the head. Source: FBI Uniform Crime Reports, "Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted," 1999

Law Enforcement Officers Killed Wearing Protective Armor, by Cause of Death, 1990-99
Law Enforcement Officers Killed Wearing Protective Armor: Location of Rounds, 1990-99

Date : 01/01/1999

Clip Length : 1

Pie chart showing where, on the upper torso, rounds hit and killed law enforcement officers who were wearing protective body armor, Most were killed when rounds hit between, below or above vest panels. Source: FBI Uniform Crime Reports, "Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted," 1999

Law Enforcement Officers Killed Wearing Protective Armor: Location of Rounds, 1990-99

Showing 1-10 of 10 assets

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