From Wheat Field to Baked Bread in 12 Minutes?

Air Date: 09/19/1995
Source:
NBC Today Show
Creator:
Bryant Gumbel, Roger O'Neil
Air/Publish Date:
09/19/1995
Event Date:
09/19/1995
Resource Type:
News Report
Copyright:
NBCUniversal Media, LLC.
Copyright Date:
1995
Clip Length:
00:02:40

In 1995, wheat farmers in Montana attempt to break the Guinness World Record for Freshest Loaf of Bread by harvesting grain from the field, grinding it into flour, mixing dough and baking it in less than 12 minutes.

From Wheat Field to Baked Bread in 12 Minutes?

BRYANT GUMBEL, anchor: They're just about ready to hit the stopwatches up in Montana for a try at the world's record for the freshest bread. Now, the goal is to go from field to finished loaf in less than 12 minutes. Our Roger O'Neil is on the scene. He's ready for the play-by-play.

Roger, the floor's yours.

ROGER O'NEIL reporting:

Hey, Bryant, how are you?

GUMBEL: OK.

O'NEIL: It's almost snowing up here, let me tell you. But let's get going in three, two, one, go! What we're trying to do is to set the world record for the world's freshest loaf of bread. Thirteen loaves of bread have to be baked to set the record. The combine is going to pull 15 pounds of wheat. It's already being taken over to the scale. We need exactly 8 and a half pounds of wheat to make these 13 loaves of bread. In order to get this done, we need 20--or, 12 minutes and 11 seconds to beat the record.

Ben here is a world-class runner. We should take a look at the instant replay from bucket to the weighing scale. I don't know how it looked. What do you think, Bryant? Boy, look at that form. The NFL clubs this weekend could use Ben on their team.

That, what we're doing now is grinding the wheat, getting ready to make the flour mixture. It's a special high-speed grinder, makes a lot of noise, needs some mufflers, so we've stepped away. And, while that's process is taking place, let's answer the question, why are we here in the first place?

Because this is where the first world record for the freshest loaf of bread was set back in 1991. Montana calls itself Big Sky Country. But this is also big wheat country, trailing only North Dakota and Kansas. On the Wheat Montana Farm, a 7,000 acre spread near Bozeman, this year's record crop is also enjoying record demand. Theirs is a specialty wheat, a favorite of small, micro-bakeries in all 50 states.

Mr. DEAN FOLKVARD (Wheat Farmer): We differentiate our wheat from the plain-Jane wheat market in a variety of different ways. We grow our wheat at around 5,000 feet above sea level, so it's a high elevation that makes our wheat have higher protein content and longer or, stronger gluten content.

GUMBEL: As we come back, the news from Three Forks, Montana, is not very good, is it, Roger?

ROGER O'NEIL reporting:

No. The grinder just didn't work, Bryant. I mean, we made dough, but it's not very good dough. We are, we're trying to bake 13 loaves now, 25 seconds left. There's the first loaf out of the oven. And it is not something…it is not pretty. I don't--I don't think you want to eat this, Bryant.

GUMBEL: No, I don't think so.

O'NEIL: So, the world record still stands with the Brits. We’ll try it again a little later this morning.

GUMBEL: OK, Roger.

O’NEIL: That’s the story from Freeport.

KATIE COURIC: Boy, what a bummer.

O’NEIL: Boy, is that bad lookin’ bread!

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