Showing 1-14 of 14 assets

Chemistry of Ice

Date : 12/22/2011

Clip Length : 00:05:53

This NBC Learn video explains how the molecular structure of H2O changes as it reaches its freezing point, and turns from a liquid to a less dense solid crystal lattice.

Chemistry of Ice
Chemistry of Salt (NaCl)

Date : 12/22/2011

Clip Length : 00:06:23

This NBC Learn video explains and illustrates the molecular structure of sodium chloride (NaCl) crystals; the structure and symmetry of crystal lattices; and why one crystalline solid, salt, melts another, ice.

Chemistry of Salt (NaCl)
Molecule Profile:  H<sub>2</sub>O - Water

Date : 01/11/2011

Clip Length : 00:04:46

This NBC Learn video "profiles" the H2O molecule -- its structure, polarity, cohesive and adhesive properties, and water's properties as a "universal" solvent.

Molecule Profile: H2O - Water
Record Breaking Storm Slams Mideast to Northwest

Date : 02/01/2011

Clip Length : 00:03:22

A triple threat of snow, ice and sleet is creating dangerous conditions across much of the nation. NBC's Al Roker tracks the record breaking storm from Chicago, Illinois.

Record Breaking Storm Slams Mideast to Northwest
Why do we put salt on icy sidewalks in the winter?

Date : 12/26/2005

Clip Length : 2

In 2003, Scientific American publishes a chemistry professor's explanation of why salt melts ice on winter sidewalks: as ions of sodium and chlorine join to water molecules, he writes, they give off heat which thaws the ice. In 2005, the magazine publishes a "representative correction" in which a chemical engineer explains that salt causes ice to melt because the salt lowers the freezing point of pure water when it dissolves into it. Source: Scientific American, December 26, 2005

Why do we put salt on icy sidewalks in the winter?
How Snowflakes Form (And Yes, Each One Is Different)

Date : 02/17/1986

Clip Length : 00:03:13

In 1986, researchers at the Schlumberger-Doll Research Lab study how ice crystals form into snowflakes, and why each snowflake has its own uniform symmetric pattern, yet is different from all other snowflakes.

How Snowflakes Form (And Yes, Each One Is Different)
Snow Crystals Slideshow

Date : 12/22/2011

Clip Length : 6

Images of six snow crystals collected in Northern Ontario, Alaska, Vermont, Michigan's Upper Peninsula and the Sierra Nevada mountains in California; captured by Caltech physics professor Kenneth G. Libbrecht, using a specially-designed snowflake photomicroscope.

Snow Crystals Slideshow
Keeping Roads on a Low-Salt Diet

Date : 02/01/2010

Clip Length : 5

This article from the February 2010 issue of Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine details the financial and environmental costs of using sodium chloride road salt to melt snow and ice on the state's highways in winter. Chloride levels in Wisconsin lakes, ponds, and groundwater aquifers are increasing, which affects local fish and plant life. Substitutes, including sand and other forms of chloride, are less effective or more expensive.

Keeping Roads on a Low-Salt Diet
Alternative to Road Salt: Liquid Made from Beets

Date : 02/24/2008

Clip Length : 00:02:16

As one answer to a shortage of road salt, researchers have developed an alternative -- a liquid made from beet juice, brine and calcium chloride -- which is cheaper and more environmentally-friendly.

Alternative to Road Salt: Liquid Made from Beets
Ice Cream Science

Date : 07/05/2006

Clip Length : 9

In this 2006 Scientific American "Science Talk" interview, two food scientists and researchers from Ben and Jerry's in Vermont explain the chemistry of ice cream, a "frozen aerated dessert" that is a three-phase emulsion: a liquid, gas and solid all at once. Source: Scientific American, July 5, 2006

Ice Cream Science
Sea Ice Extent Images, Arctic, 2002-2010

Date : 01/01/2010

Clip Length : 7

Six map images showing annual changes in sea ice area in the Arctic from September to September in the years 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2010. Shaded area show ice areas relative to the median extent (purple line) in 1980 to 2000. Sea ice area shows near-record minimums since 2002. Source: NOAA

Sea Ice Extent Images, Arctic, 2002-2010
Trends in Northern Hemisphere Sea Ice, 1970-2010

Date : 01/01/2010

Clip Length : 1

Line graph showing trends in sea ice extent and extent anomalies for the Northern Hemisphere, between 1970 and 2010. Source: National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC)

Trends in Northern Hemisphere Sea Ice, 1970-2010
Shiny Things: An Ode to Photonic Crystals

Date : 08/26/2011

Clip Length : 6

In this 2011 Scientific American "Cocktail Party Physics" blog, Jennifer Ouellette explains the structure and properties of photonic crystals -- those found in nature in opals, dragonfly wings and abalone shells, and those synthesized in laboratories for use in optical devices, LEDs, and solar cells. Source: Scientific American, August 26, 2011

Shiny Things: An Ode to Photonic Crystals
Crystals, Bouncing X-Rays and Atoms: An American Chemist and the Nobel Prize

Date : 12/10/1985

Clip Length : 00:04:06

A profile of Herbert Haupman, one of two American scientists awarded the 1985 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their discovery of molecular magnification.

Crystals, Bouncing X-Rays and Atoms: An American Chemist and the Nobel Prize

Showing 1-14 of 14 assets

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