Showing 1-14 of 14 assets

The Chemistry of Green: Chlorophyll

Date : 03/16/2011

Clip Length : 00:05:35

This NBC Learn video explains the basic role of the pigment molecule chlorophyll in photosynthesis, and explains why plants are -- or appear to be -- green: because chlorophyll molecules absorb visible light in all color wavelengths except green, which is reflected back, into our eyes.

The Chemistry of Green: Chlorophyll
Mint, Jade, Lime: Green Comes in Many Shades

Date : 01/01/2011

Clip Length : 4

A sampling of green shades of paint, with commercial names; from the offerings of U.S. paint company Benjamin Moore. Source: Benjamin Moore & Co. (2011)

Mint, Jade, Lime: Green Comes in Many Shades
Power Plants: Engineers Mimic Photosynthesis to Harvest Light Energy

Date : 12/13/2010

Clip Length : 2

This 2010 "Scientific American" article reports on quantum mechanics research being done at MIT to better mimic the way photosynthesis works in plants to harvest energy from sunlight. Researchers hope to engineer more efficient systems to use in solar cells or artificial leaves to produce fuels directly from the sun. Source: Scientific American, December 13, 2010

Power Plants: Engineers Mimic Photosynthesis to Harvest Light Energy
Newly-Discovered  Chlorophyll Scavenger Could Lead to Cheaper Biofuels

Date : 08/29/2010

Clip Length : 1

This 2010 "Scientific American" article reports that the apparent discovery of a previously-unknown form of chlorophyll -- able to absorb part of the light spectrum beyond what other chlorophyll types can absorb -- could lead to development of new strains of algae capable of converting more sunlight into energy, and producing cheaper, cleaner, and renewable biofuel oils. Source: Scientific American, August 29, 2010

Newly-Discovered Chlorophyll Scavenger Could Lead to Cheaper Biofuels
A New Form of Chlorophyll?

Date : 08/19/2010

Clip Length : 3

This 2010 "Scientific American" article reports on evidence of a previously- unknown type of chlorophyll, called chlorophyll f, that can absorb near-infrared light up to 706 nanometers on the Electromagnetic Spectrum, well past the 670 nanometers that other known types of chlorophyll can absorb. Organisms capable of using infrared light can make greater use of solar energy. Source: Scientific American, August 19, 2010

A New Form of Chlorophyll?
A Really 'Green' Energy Source: Algae

Date : 12/02/2008

Clip Length : 00:02:20

Backed by millions of dollars in venture capital, researchers are producing fuel oil from algae by feeding it carbon dioxide and growing it near CO2-producing power plants -- a renewable biofuel.

A Really 'Green' Energy Source: Algae
Word Roots:  Video

Date : 06/27/2008

Clip Length : 00:01:32

16 words, from "view" to "advise" -- derived from the Latin root "video," meaning "to see" -- are shown in this NBC animation.

Word Roots: Video
The Electromagnetic Spectrum: Diagram

Date : 05/20/2008

Clip Length : 1

Diagram of The Electromagnetic Spectrum with drawings, showing wavelengths (in meters), relative size of wavelengths, common name of waves, sources, frequency (in waves per second) and energy of one photon (in electron volts). Source: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The Electromagnetic Spectrum: Diagram
Nobel Laureate Wangari Maathai's Green Belt Movement To Plant Two Billion Trees

Date : 11/24/2007

Clip Length : 00:02:25

Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai's Green Belt Movement plans to plant two billion trees worldwide by the end of 2008, to help reduce greenhouse gases.

Nobel Laureate Wangari Maathai's Green Belt Movement To Plant Two Billion Trees
Grass Into

Date : 11/07/2007

Clip Length : 00:03:07

Microbes found in primordial hot springs, dead plants and living plants such as switch grass can transform cellulose into sugar, which can be fermented into cellulosic ethanol -- a recipe for a promising biofuel.

Grass Into "Grassoline"? Turning Cellulose into Biofuels
Plant

Date : 01/01/2006

Clip Length : 1

Map of Plant Hardiness Zones in the continental United States, indicating, by color shades, the average annual low temperatures from Zone 2 (-40 through -50 degrees Fahrenheit) to Zone 10 (30 through 40 degrees Fahrenheit). Source: The National Arbor Day Foundation

Plant "Hardiness Zones" Map (National Arbor Day Foundation, 2006)
Seeing Red: Retirement of

Date : 07/13/1990

Clip Length : 00:02:53

Crayola Crayons retires 8 "classic" colors, replacing them with 8 new, trendier colors. While some protest, children on factory tours are still captivated to see liquid (of whatever color) turn into solid crayons.

Seeing Red: Retirement of "Classic" Crayola Colors Upset Many
USDA Plant

Date : 01/01/2003

Clip Length : 1

Map of Plant Hardiness Zones in North America, indicating, by color shades, the average annual minimum temperatures from Zone 1 (below -50 degrees Fahrenheit) to Zone 11 (above 40 degrees Fahrenheit). Source: USDA

USDA Plant "Hardiness Zones" Map
Map of Changes in U.S. Plant

Date : 01/01/2006

Clip Length : 1

Map showing, with color shadings, temperature differences and shifts between a 1990 USDA map of plant Hardiness Zones in the continental United States and a 2006 map by arborday.org -- differences that "reflect warmer climate," according to the map's creator, The National Arbor Day Foundation. (2006)

Map of Changes in U.S. Plant "Hardiness Zones" Between 1990 and 2006

Showing 1-14 of 14 assets

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