Discovering You: Sangbae Kim

Air Date: 11/12/2019
Source:
NBC News Learn
Creator:
-
Air/Publish Date:
11/12/2019
Event Date:
11/12/2019
Resource Type:
News Report
Copyright:
NBCUniversal Media, LLC.
Copyright Date:
2019
Clip Length:
00:04:05

Sangbae Kim is a robotics engineer at the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT). His fascination with how a cheetah runs leads him to create a mechanical version that can jump, run and absorb shock from the ground. "Discovering You: Engineering Your World" is produced by NBC News Learn in partnership with Chevron, the American Society for Engineering Education and the National Science Foundation.

Discovering You – Engineering Your World - Sangbae Kim

SANGBAE KIM:

That's pretty good. The body control is pretty good. My name's Sangbae Kim. I'm a robotics engineer. I grew up in South Korea, and like many other kids, I'd been interested in building and taking things apart. I decided to come to the United States to study more about design. And then that's where I not only learned about the design process, but also learned about biology and biomechanics. People get excited about jet fire moving really fast in the air, maybe a submarine moving fast in the water. But it's nothing like a cheetah running in the field. You see these muscles are fluctuating; the bodies are bending like a bow, and then, like, exploding from the surface. I really wanted to create an engineering version, a mechanical version of it. And that's where we started with Cheetah one, designing all based on how can we achieve the maximum speed out of it? If you look at conventional factory robots, they are really, really precise. They are relatively strong. Yet, those robots are not capable of absorbing energy. So there are two motors here for this leg. After three years of research, we eventually developed the highest torque density electric motor in the world that allowed us to build a robot that can jump over obstacles and jump onto a table. Yet, it can absolutely absorb shock every time it hits the ground. Now we are working on version three of Cheetah robot. It's about the size of a big dog in your house. We are envisioning to use this kind of robot to operate in the environment where we don't want to send a human. Maybe in the sewer, maybe a gas leak environment or a high radiation environment. Now we have a smaller version Mini Cheetah, which we intended to use for research. This robot can do a backflip, jump and land and it doesn't break because of the special motor technologies that can absorb shock when it hits the ground. In 2050, we're going to hit this major population misbalance. Like 40 percent of the population will be over 65. Think about the lack of labor that will take care of the older people. It's not going to be this exact robot, but this component technology that can handle shock compared to told conventional robotics. We can use this component technology to help people. I think the creativity, most of the time, is putting things together. Like creativity in art as simple as choose a color and shape, and putting things together to create different emotions, different expressions. And similar thing happens in engineering. There's so many different components you want to put together in a way that has never been done before. And then it does some expression, but also it moves in a different way so that's probably where the creativity really shines.

Close NBC Learn

FILTERING

If you are trying to view the videos from inside a school or university, your IT admin may need to enable streaming on your network. Please see the Internet Filtering section of our Technical Requirements page.

DVDs AND OTHER COPIES

Videos on this page are not available on DVD at this time due to licensing restrictions on the footage.

DOWNLOADING VIDEOS

Subscribers to NBC Learn may download videos and play them back without an internet connection. Please click here to find out more about subscribing or to sign up for a FREE trial (download not included in free trial).

Still have questions?
Click here to send us an email.

Close NBC Learn

INTERNATIONAL VISITORS

The Science of the Olympic Winter Games videos are only available to visitors inside the United States due to licensing restrictions on the Olympics footage used in the videos.

FILTERING

If you are trying to view the videos from inside a school or university, your IT admin may need to enable streaming on your network. Please see the Internet Filtering section of our Technical Requirements page.

DVDs AND OTHER COPIES

The Science of the Olympic Winter Games is not available on DVD at this time due to licensing restrictions on on Olympic footage.

DOWNLOADING VIDEOS

Subscribers to NBC Learn may download videos and play them back without an internet connection. Please click here to find out more about subscribing or to sign up for a FREE trial (download not included in free trial).

Still have questions?
Click here to send us an email.

Close NBC Learn

Choose your product

NBC Learn K-12 product site
NBC Learn Higher Ed product site

For NBC Learn in Blackboard™ please log in to your institution's Blackboard™ web site and click "Browse NBC Learn"

Close NBC Learn

If you have received a new user registration code from your institution, click your product below and use the "Register now" link to sign up for a personal account.

NBC Learn K-12 product site
NBC Learn Higher Ed product site

For further assistance, please contact our NBC Learn Support Team and we'll be happy to assist you.

Start Your Free
day
Day Trial!