CHEMISTRY NOW: Nobel Chemists (Grades 9-12) Print

Objective:

Students will investigate the process of selecting and awarding the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Students will conduct research on a Nobel prize-winner of their choosing in the field of Chemistry. Students will analyze the impact that the chemist’s discovery had on the field of science


Introduction Notes:

CHEMISTRY NOW: Nobel Chemists

 

 

 

Title:

 

 

Nobel Chemists

 

Subject/Topic:

 

 

Science

 

Grades:

 

 

9–12

 

Standards

Alignment:

 

 

Science as Inquiry 9–12

 

Time Allowance:

 

 

Four or five 45-minute class periods

 

 

Overview and Purpose/Objective(s)

(information, concepts to be learned):

 

1.      Students will investigate the process of selecting and awarding the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

2.      Students will conduct research on a Nobel prize-winner of their choosing in the field of Chemistry.

3.      Students will analyze the impact that the chemist’s discovery had on the field of science.

 

 

Materials:

         Internet access for each student

         Slide/brochure software for each student/group

         Teacher rubric for each student

 

         ACTIVITY/ENGAGEMENT

(reinforcing lesson, making real-world connections)

 

For this lesson students should start with basic knowledge of the history of the Nobel Prize and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry: 

 

Every year since 1901 the Nobel Prize has been awarded for achievements in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature and for peace. The Nobel Prize is an international award administered by the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden. In 1968, Sveriges Riksbank established The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, founder of the Nobel Prize. Each prize consists of a medal, personal diploma, and a cash award. 

 

Chemistry was the most important science for Alfred Nobel’s own work. The development of his inventions as well as the industrial processes he employed were based upon chemical knowledge. Chemistry was the second prize area that Nobel mentioned in his will.

In 1901 the very first Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Jacobus H. van 't Hoff for his work on rates of reaction, chemical equilibrium, and osmotic pressure. In more recent years, the Chemistry Laureates have increased our understanding of chemical processes and their molecular basis, and have also contributed to many of the technological advancements we enjoy today.

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry is awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.   Source:www.nobelprize.org

Class Starter:

 

Have students begin by brainstorming about the following questions:

 

    How and why was the Nobel Prize developed?

   How many categories does the Nobel Prize honor?

   How were the categories decided upon, and do you think there should be new categories added?

   If so, what categories?


Research Presentation Requirements:

Ask students to create a presentation outlining the life and achievements of a Nobel Prize-winning chemist.  Students can work individually or in groups of two or three. Individual students or groups of students can be assigned, or can select, a Nobel Laureate in chemistry. 

This project is best done as a slide presentation, or as a brochure flier.

Information to include in the presentation:

    Background of your chemist: childhood, education, family, retirement. Maybe ask the students what THEY think could be important to include here. What would people need to know about the chemist to better understand his or her life and contributions?

    What led to your chemist’s discovery? Was the research done independently or did the chemist collaborate with others?

    Why was this discovery important? How did it impact the scientific world? Did it impact society in general?

    How might science be different had this discovery not been made?

    Do you believe that this discovery was worthy of a Nobel Prize? Why?

    Did your chemist go on to do more research and make additional discoveries?

    What did the chemist do with the prize award?

 

Here is a list of some of the most famous Chemistry Nobel Prize winners:

Marie Curie

Frederick Sanger
Sir William Ramsay
Eduard Buchner
Lord Ernest Rutherford
Alfred Werner
Theodore William Richards
Richard Martin Willstatter

 

A complete list of Nobel Laureates in Chemistry can be found at:

 

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/ or

 

http://nobelprizes.com/nobel/chemistry/

 

 

Resources to get started:

http://www.nobelprize.org/

http://www.nobelprize.org/alfred_nobel/biographical/articles/life-work/gradeschool.html

 

http://almaz.com/nobel/chemistry/chemistry.html

http://www.factmonster.com/spot/nobel-prize-history.html

 

 

Concluding Discussion/Activities:

 

With today’s technology and speed of advancements, does the Nobel Prize still hold the same value as it might have in the early 1900's?

 

How do you think this year’s Nobel Prize winners will impact the science community?

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher Grading Rubric:

Categories

4

3

2

1


 Spelling & Grammar

There are no spelling or grammar errors.

There are 2–3 spelling or grammar errors.

There are 4–5 spelling or grammar errors.

There are 6 or more spelling or grammar errors.



Layout

The project is well organized and easy to follow.

The project is somewhat organized, flow is slightly difficult to follow.

The project is poorly organized, and difficult to follow.

The project is not organized, and very difficult to follow.



Background Research

The background history on the chemist is detailed, interesting, and accurate.

The background history on the chemist is somewhat detailed, interesting, and accurate.

The background history is vague, and not very accurate.

There is very little background information and not accurate.



Discovery Research

The discovery  information for the chemist is detailed, interesting, and accurate.

The discovery information for the chemist is somewhat detailed, interesting, and accurate.

The discovery information is vague, and it is not very accurate.

There is very little discovery information and it is not accurate.


Effect & Opinion of Discovery

The opinion about and effects of the discovery are well thought out and supported.

The opinion about and effects of the discovery are somewhat thought out and supported.

The opinion about and effects of the discovery are poorly thought out and supported.

The opinion about and effects of the discovery are not presented.



Total Points/Grade:

 

Feedback:

 

 

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