Live Report from Ship Doing 3-D Scan of Titanic Wreck

Air Date: 08/28/2010
Source:
NBC Nightly News
Creator:
Lester Holt/Kerry Sanders
Air/Publish Date:
08/28/2010
Event Date:
08/28/2010
Resource Type:
News Report
Copyright:
NBCUniversal Media, LLC.
Copyright Date:
2010
Clip Length:
00:03:10

NBC's Kerry Sanders reports live from a research vessel in the North Atlantic, using 3-D HD cameras on a remotely-operated vehicle to scan the wreckage of the Titanic, two miles underwater.

Live Report from Ship Doing 3-D Scan of Titanic Wreck

LESTER HOLT, anchor:

Now to the world’s most famous sea-wreck - the Titanic. It sunk nearly a century ago but tonight we are live with a crew of an historic high-tech mission that is mapping every inch of the wreckage. NBC’s Kerry Sanders is aboard the research vessel in the North Atlantic where that difficult work is going on. Kerry, good evening.

KERRY SANDERS, reporting:

Well Lester, I’m down in the belly of the vessel right now where if I put on these 3-D glasses and look over at the special monitors I can see the images in 3-D. let me take you down there. There, you’re now looking at it in 2-D, of course, because folks don’t have 3-D televisions at home or the glasses. We’re two miles down there and you’re only seeing these 2-D images but either way it’s a stunning view of what was once called the “unsinkable” Titanic. On an evening shrouded in fog, much the way it was almost 100 years ago when Titanic hit an iceberg here, crews launched the remotely operated video into the deep.

Unidentified MALE VOICE: I’ll just put to head a little bit point to going ahead. You still want to go stern a little bit.

SANDERS: Fixed with an array of cameras it descends two miles down. Billy Lange was the first to spot the wreckage of the Titanic 25 years ago. It was his idea to come back now with 3-D HD cameras.

WILLIAM LANGE: We’re seeing things that uh we haven’t seen before and we’re seeing things we’ve seen before in a different way.

Unidentified MALE: Go as easy as you can we’re, we’re getting a lot of hits right now.

SANDERS: The expedition team, all wearing special 3-D glasses, remains glued to the monitors studying the bow, the railings, the anchor chains, still in position, as if the ship left port yesterday. Along the starboard side portholes, some reflecting the cameras lights. Glass is still in place 98 years after the ship sank. That’s of special interest to underwater archeologist Jim Delgado who noticed some of those portholes are open.

Voice of JIM DELGADO: It could be that a number of people opened their portholes to take a look and that helped contribute to bringing Titanic down a little faster.

SANDERS: Experts believe this front section of the ship crashed into the ocean at an angle, traveling upwards of 30 miles per hour. That’s the mail room which exploded on impact. Inside there’s a ladder still visible.

Voice of DELGADO: The ladder is still in place. You can actually see where these guys were scrambling as Titanic started to fill with water.

SANDERS: Now it’s going to take the R.M.S. Titanic and their team of assembled experts here months to get through all of this footage that they’re gathering. This is a one month expedition. But tonight there is a little bit of a glitch, in the same way that Mother Nature did in the Titanic with an iceberg, Mother Nature is chasing the researchers back to shore a little bit early just temporarily. Hurricane Danielle is headed right here so the ROV will come out of the water later tonight and by late tonight the ship will start steaming back to land about 400 miles to New Finland. Lester.

HOLT: A remarkable view, Kerry Sanders, thanks for sharing it with us tonight we appreciate it.

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